MarsEarth

Old world wisdom, new world insight – poems, poetry, philosophy, dreams, commentary, ideas


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ON THE COOL SIDE

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

I got a Telegram it read: “Already answered.
We know you know these things
come down from above
But see, the Message was supposed to be a question:
“Say, do you know the meaning
or the reason
for love?”

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La LLorona – the weeping woman (revisited)

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

la llorona, marsearth,

Natalia Lafourcade

There is a legendary tale in Mexico (and the American southwest) about a beautiful woman who weeps in anguish and sheds many tears.
She is a woman whose children died.

It is said that her ghost haunts the rivers and streams and waterways because her children drowned.
And she drowned them herself – in anger against her husband’s unfaithfulness.

Among the stories told and re-told in families with Hispanic traditions,
the tale of “La LLorona” (lah yore-RONE-nah) is probably the scariest.

I have heard versions in English and in Spanish,
and with a very few embellishment, the haunting cries of this distraught woman give chills to this day.

(Thanks to my Tío Andrés, our Spanish folktale story teller.)

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La Malagueña Salerosa – Spanish and English

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Malagueña Salerosa” — also known as “La Malagueña” — is a well-known “Son Huasteco” song from Mexico.
It is in the public domain the same way the famous song, Cielito Lindo, is and also is very well-known in the Americas.

 Incidentally, Elpidio Ramírez registered the lyrics in 1947. However the song was already known as a type of “Huapango” which is a type of song written “long before the construction of the Cathedral of Huejutla.” In other words, it was already a well-known ballad. So, there seem to be no real claim to the song for Ramirez.

This translation (below) and the American musical interpretation (click link below) are the most culturally accurate and follow the poetic originality in the Huapango tradition. This version is a rock gem!

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The Saddest Songs of Rock and Roll – #34

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

We live in a place where people are in despair. They suffer in public. Sometimes we see them hurting and we reach out with water, change, advice, or a meal. Other times we just concentrate on getting as far away as possible.

For English singer-songwriter Phil Collins, the thrust of his music is more than painting pictures with words. He describes realistic and stark scenes. Sometimes they have happy but complicated endings with upbeat rhythms. Other times the music is eerie and the lyrics hurt to hear. For Phil the prospect of having an encounter with a homeless man, as described in the 1982 release by his former band, Genesis, was a Top 40 sensation in America.  The song “Man on the Corner” saw a person down on his luck and with no place to go,  It had an “I see him” kind of detached feel.

Unfortunately, just like every other music artist who puts his/ her politics in front of the audience, the critics rightfully invoked the “hypocrisy label” on Phil because his wealth was being used as he called on  everyone else to act. As if singing about homelessnes is supposed to be a socially conscious and caring contribution. It is however quite lucrative for a musician.

Phil understood this formula and altered his lyrics for a song that ended up as the first track on the B-side of his fourth solo album, “. . .But Seriously.” It was a poignant description of a homeless woman’s plight. Phil’s tone and melody bring a an aura of shame and sadness to the radio. While singing along has caused us to convict ourselves of not doing enough. It is easy to feel sympathy for anyone who truthfull lives in the streets. It is hard to spring into action for each person’s need is as unique as their fingerprints.

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As each year passes / Como cada año pasa / So vergeht jedes Jahr

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

A poem of transition from womb to woman
here in English, Spanish, and German.

English

As each year passes

As each year passes new words
are spoken for fairytales and  tunes.
In the evenings sprites, by day, the birds.
Festive parties with balloons.
The taller you stand, the bluer your eyes.
A song in your heart; how we empathize. Continue reading