MarsEarth

Old world wisdom, new world insight – poems, poetry, philosophy, dreams, commentary, ideas


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What your BRAND CANNOT DO (with a cell phone)

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

I woke up this morning. I guess that was a good thing? I got to work and discovered that I forgot my cell phone at home.
As a commuter I was unarmed with video “gotcha” technology.
More importantly, I was not distracted by incessant texts.
I was able to turn on the car radio and listen to real people — speaking — on the air — to me.

Usually, when I get to work my older friends ask me how I am doing.
Telling them anything other than the truth is betrayal.
So, the confession they hear is, “I got up. So, now I’ve got something to complain about.”
And we laugh.
My younger friends ask me, “How is it going?” Telling them anything other than “It’s all good” is TMI (too much information).
Neither group notices I am off the grid this day.
Has this happened to you?

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Saddest Songs of Rock and Roll – #47

by Lawrence J. J, Leonard

Deep seeded memories can be as happy as hugs, kisses, laughter, smells, and compassion. Alternatively, we can sustain images of cruelty, neglect or harmful incidents.
This was the mindset of Americans after the Civil War (1861-1865) digging the graves of honorable veterans. Our grandparents and great-grandparents and their forebears were devastated and torn apart by violent conflict in this land we call home.

Canadian composer Robbie Robertson and his music project, The Band, took the view that this aspect of America’s homegrown war deserved a closer look. Robbie had been working on the song with founding band member Levon Helm in Woodstock.

They researched the Union Army’s “Stoneman Raids” and developed a song about Virgil. It is from this poor southerner’s perspective that the 1969 ballad expressed the sadness of a citizen crushed by the might of his own countrymen’s military fury.

The sorrowful lament was unranked when The Band released the record. It was thoughtfully re-released as a cover by American folk singer Joan Baez in 1971. War is hell.

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Saddest Songs of Rock and Roll – #48

by Lawrence J. J, Leonard

More than 2,500 years ago Greek story writer Aesop used fables to illustrate new perspectives. This allowed the audience to walk in “another’s shoes.” The ‘Boys and Frogs’ fable explains how some hell-raising boys decided to hurl stones at a small army of pond frogs for the fun of it.

This causes one of the frogs to raise its head and say,” I beg you stop, boys. What is sport to you is death to us.” The moral is “one person’s pleasure can be another’s pain.” This happened to the British progressive rock band Emerson, Lake & Palmer (ELP).

 

Accordingly, Keith Emerson really did not want to release the late edition Greg Lake track. Greg had composed the song when he was only 12 years old. The lyrics celebrated a man whose fortune came with a high price.

Drummer Carl Palmer had to engineer the acoustic rendition and develop the recording with layers of sound in an effort to capture its “minstrel” feel.

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An unreasonable facsimile

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Always on. Electronic reminderlings.
Hear the alerts and notices?
Now the tones of contacts in the air – not callers.

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