MarsEarth

Old world wisdom, new world insight – poems, poetry, philosophy, dreams, commentary, ideas


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Two cents worthy

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

The following “One Liners” are not necessarily puns.
I happily share them with you because when you read this,

you may have forgotten that it’s not quite Friday.
Here are my two cents worth of smile material.

And they make great toasts for your next imbibe interval.
Cheers! or Gotcha!

* Life is ugly. Get a faith lift.

* I was addicted to the Hokey Pokey. Then I turned myself around.

* Save the planet! It’s the only one with beer.

* Six out of seven dwarfs are not happy.

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Funny thing about Robots

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Queen News of the World

American artist Frank Kelly Freas altered his 1953 painting for Queen’s album art.

They used to cling and clang. They were faceless and only had numbers for identification.
We now refer to them as “A” “I” creatures. But robots, as they will always be known,
only get the AI designation if they are higher up in the chip processing pecking order.

What is our fascination with a pile of bolts and silica personified? Power?

Is it that we want more than just a reflection of what we see? Relationship?

Is it that we are so surrounded by wonderful creation that we are inspired to re-create creation?

Robots seem to give us a pathway to enhance our own reality. Like Radio Controlled cars and drones.
Not like Virtual Reality (VR) at all. More so in a physical way.

These days robots can be much more.
How is this possible?
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Inanimate Objects don’t know they are inanimate

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Remember the times
we all have stubbed our toes?
That sofa corner says,
“This is the altar of foot woes.”

Lifted a glass full of liquid
and it spilled off the table?
The moisture surrounding it says,
“No grip is able.”

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What is the opposite of ‘bananas’ ?

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Let’s see. This is not a trick question, but it is a concern which some Team Leaders should assess when building rapport and especially when mentoring new hires and promotable employees. What does going bananas mean?

The term bananas first appeared in the US in 1942 “The American Thesaurus of Slang: a complete reference book of colloquial speech in the definition for eccentric” with a meaning of: “Balmy, bats, bent, crazy . . .” In 1833 an American slang meaning of the term bent was to be interpreted as intoxicated with alcohol or drugs. So, this just a definition using slang to define other slang.

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The Saddest Songs of Rock and Roll – #10

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Can we ‘have our cake and eat it, too?’ This is an example of a kind of paradox. If we eat it, it is gone then we do not have it. If we have it, we cannot eat it, too, because it would be gone. It is akin to saying, ‘this statement is false.’ Which may be true. But, it cannot be both ‘false’ and ‘true’ at the same time. In some instances we look at our own lives and say to ourselves, “I refuse to live like this.” Then again, paradoxically we are here, living those lives we are refusing to endure.

Consider the American rock band Shinedown. They hail from Jacksonville, Florida, and were formed by singer-songwriter Brent Smith. He started the band after his self titled “Smith” band broke up while still under contract with Atlantic Records. He reorganized in 2002 and recruited original band members: guitarist Jasin Todd, bassist Brad Stewart, and percussionist Barry Kerch. But these members did not stay together for long. The group members outgrew each other after the first two albums. And it was these works which sparked the Shinedown trek into music history. To date the band has accounted for over 10 million records sold.  They have 11 #1 singles on the Billboard Hot 100 Mainstream Rock charts, which is third behind Van Halen and Three Days Grace.

Being happy or sad or upset with the way our current situation is, may be a matter of choice. Each day we face situations that are thrust upon us. We somehow keep trying over and over to get it right. This is how Shinedown eventually began writing songs that dealt with pain and angst for their debut album “Leave a Whisper.” They crafted lyrics which discussed coping with life’s hurts and disappointments. After  a handful of demos and seven auditions for a drummer, which Barry eventually made the grade, they were able to fulfill their recording contract. The first track, “Fly from the Inside” was released as a single just two months before the album debuted.  The song which featured cries of pain and frustration peaked at #5. Then there was another song which sparked some serious controversy.

This new new song was reportedly not about suicide but about being comfortable in your own skin. Apparently, the world hands us the power to enjoy the gift of life or the power to destroy our own world. The group’s fans reacted favorably to the desolate guitar riffs and gloomy tone of the melody.  Do we have the will to get through the ashes of a bad day despite our fears?

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The Saddest Songs of Rock and Roll – #12

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Who is the one to say ‘this is how it is’ in a relationship ?  You or me? Eventually we will decide which one of us is going to be the leader. When dealing with feelings, it is true that one person loves more than the other.  That does not mean love is not worth the price we pay. But, we all know Human beings take advantage of this position in order to tease (both meanly and playfully), to critique and even to humiliate. It gets worse when the proverbial pot is calling the kettle black.

The American rock band Staind is made up of Aaron Lewis – lead vocals, Mike Mushok – lead guitar, Johnny April – bass, and Jon Wysocki – drums.  The four formed in 1995 and cut their first album in 1996. Near the end of Year 2000 they were cutting their third album, “Break the Cycle  in a network of  studios from LA to New York City to Miami, Florida. While the band was known for lyrics that were angry and depressing, it was cutting its teeth in a new metal and post-grunge style that expressed the difficulties of relationships. One song in particular highlighted what it feels like when the misgivings of a cruel lover are finally exposed.

The easiest thing to do is to criticize another person. It happens every day on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and every other overly social web that invites comment and controversy. Among our friends we talk about it at work, we engage in it behind the wheel, and raise our voices to our world’s leadership, especially those who lack leadership. What should our attitude be when the one closest to us breaks our hearts with hurtful words and hipocrisy?

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The Saddest Songs of Rock and Roll – #22

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Years of experience have taught our old time farmers what to expect in a given situation. Pleasant weather turning bad. What is a good tool and what is a better tool to use for a job. How to not let your eyes fool you – so use a measuring stick.  And, what it really takes to get from point A to point B.  There is always that outlier, that one freak possibility which can cause everything to go wrong. We are instructed to be prepared for that outcome and especially a loss in any case.

In 1968 Michael Martin Murphey was a student at UCLA, working on a concept album for Kenny Rogers. The work meant long hours and little sleep. In his fatigue Michael is said to have dreamed of a song.  He woke up and by the next morning wrote it down. He told an interviewer that the song reminded him of a story his grandfather told him when he was a little boy. It detailed a Native American legend about a ghost horse.

Michael was teamed up with Boomer Castleman in 1967 as part of a duo known as the Lewis & Clark Expedition (which had a brief stint on TV).   After Michael began his solo career later in 1968 he co-wrote his song with Larry Cansler. They were struggling in southern California at the time.

By 1971 Michael came back to Texas and joined the “Outlaw Country” movement. He was working along side Willie Nelson and Jerry Jeff Walker. Michael created a unique blend of country, rock, and folk music. This caught the ear of Epic Records managers who produced four albums for him, including “Blue Sky – Night Thunder” which peaked at #18 on the Billboard 200 Album chart in 1975. This was the seminal work of Michael’s career. The lead track of the album still brings young girls and old men to tears. It is the tale of a man facing devastating weather, a runaway prized pony, and a lost love.

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