MarsEarth

Old world wisdom, new world insight – poems, poetry, philosophy, dreams, commentary, ideas


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HOPE is not a four-letter word

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

“Allegory of hope” Francesco Guardi  1747

In speaking English or learning to speak it, there are some idiomatic phrases which take on certain meanings.

Expressions and exclamations are usually formed when certain words become more commonly used by active groups or pockets of society.

This makes the language more useful and in some cases more colorful and expressive.

More people are then very willing to use a new expression in regular conversation because it is helpful in conveying the meaning of something important.

The subject of much contemplation this summer I am concentrating on is hope
Hope is defined as “the feeling that what is wanted – can be had.
Also, it can mean that what is wanted will turn out for the best.”

What is it about hope that causes us to feel optimistic?

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Opera – the OG Mash-up*

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

The Magic Flute

What is the attraction to opera?

It is symphony and brass band, plus more.

It is ballet and passionate couples, but still more. 

It is theater with murder and lust and gentle creatures, and yet much, much more.

I saw my first opera at the age of 10, it was a travelling company performing a snippet of the Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart opera “The Magic Flute.” It was loud and boisterous.

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Pun Control – Nine – AI and OEU and sometimes Y

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Technologies are advancing so quickly that we have to plan our lives around times without electronic devices, just to feel human.

It all started with Quantum Mechanics. Robert Hooke a natural philosopher, architect and polymath from England,
proposed in the 1600s that force and gravity had attractive properties in space.

From these humble beginnings we know that light travels faster than sound.
This is why some Humans appear bright BEFORE we hear them speak.

~~~

Human: What happened when Chuck Norris and Time had a race?

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La LLorona – the weeping woman (revisited)

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

la llorona, marsearth,

Natalia Lafourcade

There is a legendary tale in Mexico (and the American southwest) about a beautiful woman who weeps in anguish and sheds many tears.
She is a woman whose children died.

It is said that her ghost haunts the rivers and streams and waterways because her children drowned.
And she drowned them herself – in anger against her husband’s unfaithfulness.

Among the stories told and re-told in families with Hispanic traditions,
the tale of “La LLorona” (lah yore-RONE-nah) is probably the scariest.

I have heard versions in English and in Spanish,
and with a very few embellishment, the haunting cries of this distraught woman give chills to this day.

(Thanks to my Tío Andrés, our Spanish folktale story teller.)

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Memories returning

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Memories

You said you had a question about the way we live
explaining that there was a girl you knew long, long ago
who used to walk with you to school.

She always talked about her house.

She revealed that her bedroom had no windows.

 Then one day you went to visit her there
and saw for yourself.

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Dreams, between the dark and the light

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Beyond the concentration of handicraft
above the slumber of well-fed babes
turn the head ever so slightly and
pass through the realm awaiting.

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The Saddest Songs of Rock and Roll – # 2

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

How many times have we felt as if the world was against us? Like we were somehow earmarked for bad things to keep on happening? As if it was not enough to get bad news, but also to have something embarrassing compound and insult? Maybe at least once in life, or maybe once but for a long period of time? When this kind of “overkill” descended upon us, it was uncalled for. Not necessary. No real reason. Like being victim of collision on the open sea. As a lightning strike. We ask G_d, “Why is this happening to me?” and at other times, “Me, again?!” In some circumstances it may feel as if life itself is falling in all around us.

For Irish singer-songwriter, Gilbert O’Sullivan, born Raymond Edward, on December 1, 1946 (and still composing), expressing pain and suffering, separation and anxiety in music made for a successful career. His epic hits in the early 1970s were gateway works which single-handedly expressed the anguish of losing a loved one. They are now iconic in the world of popular music. Gilbert was born in Cork Road, Waterford, Ireland. While still in grade school his family moved to London, and later, Swindon.  As a teenager he played drums in a band named Rick’s Blues. Band members included guitarist  Malcolm Mabbett, bassist Keith Ray and Rick Davies, who later founded the progressive rock band Supertramp. Gilbert’s musical talent as a solo artist was heralded greatly in America.

His personal life did not play out in his songs, surprisingly. Gilbert was exposed to gut-wrenching suffering of death, disease and disappointment which allowed him to craft songs that we relate to. Recently, he told a reporter that, “a good lyricist has to have an understanding of [sad] situations, and this allows me to go into an area and write about it in a genuine way.” He went on to say that he did not know his father well growing up. And he found out that is father did not treat his mother well.  What is the sound of the Human psyche when it reveals the ruin of another person?

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