MarsEarth

Old world wisdom, new world insight – poems, poetry, philosophy, dreams, commentary, ideas


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The Saddest Songs of Rock and Roll – # 5

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Is there any significant difference between longing, yearning, and pining. Each word gives a feeling of separation, emptiness, incompleteness or even loss. Why do Humans have such feelings and dreams and fears? These emotions often propel us into that place where being away from a loved one can invoke physical pain. Is it because we were designed this way? Was it a set of learned combinations?

Human societies must have suffered a lot in order to teach the next generation to be mindful of  sadness. We still glorify pain and loss in our stories and songs today. When was the first time these words were ever spoken: “I miss you” ? We may have uttered this phrase aloud after reading a letter from someone far away. Or, we could have longed, yearned, and pined for a loved one after discovering that they were undergoing a difficult trial or some extreme hardship.

Our best artists use musical instruments to generate vibrations mimicking groans that excite the brain. These sounds invite use to relive our valuable memories. Mellow tones for self-awareness and high shrill vibrations for self-preservation. Distinctive melodies cause us to feel both joy and pain. David Gilmour, Roger Waters, Nick Mason and Richard Wright of Pink Floyd the progressive rock band constantly were constantly perfecting a combination of sounds to evoke emotion. This was evident in the group’s ninth studio album “Wish You Were Here.” It was released in the UK on the Harvest Record label, and on Columbia Records in the USA. Neither company could keep up with the public’s demand for the it. The saddest song on the record asked the most questions.

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La Malagueña Salerosa – Spanish and English

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

Malagueña Salerosa” — also known as “La Malagueña” — is a well-known “Son Huasteco” song from Mexico.
It is in the public domain the same way the famous song, Cielito Lindo, is and also is very well-known in the Americas.

 Incidentally, Elpidio Ramírez registered the lyrics in 1947. However the song was already known as a type of “Huapango” which is a type of song written “long before the construction of the Cathedral of Huejutla.” In other words, it was already a well-known ballad. So, there seem to be no real claim to the song for Ramirez.

This translation (below) and the American musical interpretation (click link below) are the most culturally accurate and follow the poetic originality in the Huapango tradition. This version is a rock gem!

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AI Counterculture: Humans make the rules and Humans break the rules

by Lawrence J. J. Leonard

A long time ago in the dinosaur age of the 1960s, there was a group of enlightened musicians living in a then functional country named “Greece.” Before the recession of 2006 through 2009, or the adoption of the Euro Dollar, a debt crisis wrecked Greece’s economy.

This upheaval at home spurred four young Greeks to foretell the future.

 

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