Saddest Songs of Rock and Roll – #46

by Lawrence J. J, Leonard

When a friend gives advice, it ususally comes when they notice something is not quite right. In 1974 brothers Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb, the Bee Gees music group, were stuck in rut. They had already produced 10 albums for worldwide distribution, but they were not inspired to perform.. Their friend Eric Clapton, fresh from the breakup of his band Derek and the Dominos, just finished a solo recoding session in Miami, Florida. Eric suggested his Ocean Boulevard digs.

Eric was brave enough to speak out of concern. Barry later admitted that it was good advice. Nobody argues with change when it promotes something positive to develop. Most of the time it forces us to stop doing the same old same old. While in America’s sunshine state, the Bee Gees’ music stylings began to head in a new direction. They re-recorded previous tracks with a more R&B style. They even hinted in their lyrics that this new approach might be a failure.

In 1975 when they released the Main Course album their new sound and entertainment stylings were more energetic than previous efforts. The album stayed on The Billboard Top 200 Albums chart for 74 straight weeks. A vindication for the reinvention of their music style.

Change is good, but it can hurt. No matter how many times we think we are in a groove, we can look at ourselves in a new way. Deciding to become a better person usually starts with asking the question: “Can’t you feel the wind of change?”

Number 46
The song, “Wind of Change” was not released as a single depsite having all the components of an up-tempo dance hit and hot keybord licks from Welsh musican and record producer Derek “Blue” Weaver. The song even has what amounts to a desperate prayer inside of it: “Show us the road to go. Help us survive.”

The album became the Bee Gees’s eleventh world-wide release. It was drastically different from where they started as a 1958 harmonious trio.

There are days when we should own our flaws. We should self-accept and engage all parts of our lives. Today, we can do something to make ourselves better. It is a necessary part of thriving.

Lyrics:  written by Barry Gibb and Robin Gibb

In the streets of New York City every man can feel the cold.
And I don’t want no pity but, I want my story told.

When the lights shine down on me, they shine on the little boy.
Is this way to make him pay; be’ng born in a world of joy.

But like me he don’t know where he’ll go wrong;
he won’t cry so many tears till he finds out why
he don’t belong
like me
there’s no room for us out there; you can lose your hope and pride.
When it comes to broken dreams you’ll get your share.
Sometimes a man breaks down, and the good things he is looking for
are crushed into the ground.

Get on up, look around.
Can’t you feel the wind of change?
Get on up, taste the air.
Can’t you see the wind of change?

Don’t you understand what I’m saying? We need a god down there.
A man to lead us children,
take us from the valley of fear.

Make the lights shine down on us, show us the road to go.
Help us survive, make us arrive,
teach us what we need to know.

But like me he don’t know where he’ll go wrong.
He won’t cry so many tears till he finds out why
he don’t belong
like me
there’s no room for us out there; you can lose your hope and pride.
When it comes to broken dreams you’ll get your share.

Sometimes a man breaks down, down, down, down
and the good things he is looking for
are crushed into the ground.

Get on up, look around.
Can’t you feel the wind of change?
Get on up, taste the air.
Can’t you see the wind of change?
(repeat)

Yayayayaya
Get on up, look around.
Can’t you feel the wind of change?
Get on up, taste the air.
Can’t you see the wind of change?
(repeat)

If you are feeling depressed, do something about it. Please find help before making any rash decisions.  Click this resource, the National Institute of Mental Health.

Copyright © 1960-2017 Lawrence J. J. Leonard All rights reserved.

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